One World, One Industry: Voting—A Civic Duty and Industry Opportunity


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Editor’s note: We are pleased to introduce our newest columnist, IPC’s president, John Mitchell who will be writing on all facets of the electronics industry and IPC in particular.
 
On Tuesday, November 8, more than 240 million people in the United States will have the opportunity to go to the polls and vote, make their voices heard in government, and influence the direction of public policy for years to come. Much of the world is closely watching with interest in this major U.S. election.
 
As the leader of a trade association that represents the electronics manufacturing industry in the U.S. and worldwide, if you are an eligible U.S. voter, I urge you to exercise your civic duty and vote.
 
The United States was forged out of revolution and war more than 200 years ago on principles of freedom and justice. The U.S. Constitution guarantees citizens the freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of press, among other cherished liberties.
 
The Constitution also guarantees the privilege to choose who will represent us in government and to advocate for laws that align with our interests and beliefs.
 
Regardless of your political affiliation or views on specific candidates, the government continues to be a vital driver of opportunities to advance the manufacturing industry. 
 
Among the key issues for driving innovation and advanced manufacturing include: creating and funding more manufacturing research and development programs; promoting a 21st Century economy and workforce by supporting STEM education and corporate tax reform; and advocating for smart regulations based on science and a balance of costs and benefits.
 
As described in a related article by Ken Schramko published last week, there is much at stake for our industry in this next Congress, including opportunities to increase federal funding for research and development; support the first federal nanotechnology bill; reform the tax code; strengthen the federal focus on STEM education; and ease the burdens of the Department of Labor’s new overtime rules.
 
As president and CEO of IPC, it is my job to help advance the interests of electronics manufacturers in the U.S. and worldwide.
 
That global perspective offers me key insights into how many of our member companies face similar challenges related to economic policy, taxation, regulation, talent, and taxes. At the end of the day, we in the electronics industry are all in this together. Despite vastly different geographies, languages, legal structures, and cultures, we are all part of one world, one industry. To cite a wise expression, we need to think globally and act locally.
 
On November 8, Americans will elect a new president, 435 members of the U.S. House, 34 U.S. senators, 36 governors, and thousands of other state and local officials who will shape key manufacturing policy issues for years to come.
 
On matters of tax, international trade, environmental regulation, education, labor standards, and more, Election Day offers you and your families a vote and a voice.
 
If you are an eligible U.S. voter, please join me in exercising your hard-fought right to vote on November 8.
 
As citizens of the U.S., the world, and the manufacturing industry, it’s time to make our voices heard.
 
 
John Mitchell is president and CEO of IPC−Association Connecting Electronics Industries.

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