Lenovo Develops Innovative Low Temperature Solder Process


Reading time ( words)

Lenovo has announced a new patent-pending Low Temperature Solder (LTS) process developed to improve PC manufacturing by conserving energy and increasing reliability.

Ever since having to abandon the use of lead-based solder more than 10 years ago due to environmental concerns, the electronics industry has been searching for a solution to reduce heat, power consumption and carbon emissions by improving the tin-based solder process which replaced the older lead-based process. The newer tin-based process required extremely high temperatures consuming more energy and adding significant stress on components.

With a new LTS process, Lenovo proves it continues to be at the forefront of innovation, introducing a game-changing manufacturing process that is not only applicable to Lenovo products, but can be universally applied to all electronics manufacturing involving printed circuit boards with no cost or performance impact to customers.

The true innovation is in the science and testing required to develop and validate the new LTS process. Lenovo investigated thousands of combinations of solder paste material composed of a mixture of tin, copper, bismuth nickel and silver, specific compositions of flux material and unique profiles of time and heat temperatures that combine to enable this process. As is typical in standard electronics assembly using surface mount technology (SMT), the solder and flux mixture is first printed on the face of the circuit board. The components are then added and heat is applied to melt the solder mixture, securing and connecting the components to the board. With the new LTS process, soldering heat is applied at maximum temperatures of 180°C, a reduction of 70°C from the previous method. Throughout testing and validation, Lenovo used existing materials to compose the solder paste and existing oven equipment for heating, thus Lenovo can implement the new system without increasing production costs.

After validation of the procedure, Lenovo discovered a significant reduction in carbon emissions as a result of using the new process. The procedure is already in production for ThinkPad E series and the 5th generation X1 Carbon recently announced at CES. Throughout 2017, Lenovo intends to implement the new LTS process on eight SMT lines and estimates savings of up to 35% on carbon emissions. By the end of 2018, Lenovo aims to have 33 SMT lines with two ovens per line using this new process, giving an estimated annual saving of 5,956 metric tons of CO2. To put this into perspective, the equivalent reduction in CO2 emissions is equal to the consumption of 670,170 gallons of gasoline per year. 

Through the new process, Lenovo also expects better reliability for its devices due to lower heat stress during the "oven bake" procedure. In the early stages of deployment, Lenovo has observed a 50% decrease in printed circuit board warpage and a reduction in defective parts per million during the manufacturing process.

"By implementing the new LTS process, Lenovo is continuing to show its commitment to upholding sustainable business practices across its PC business," said Luis Hernandez, vice president, Lenovo PC and Smart Devices Integrated Development Center. "Our focus on innovation extends beyond R&D and product design, to the way our products are manufactured. We are dedicated to advancing our business goals while reducing our impact on the environment and we’re proud this process achieves that."

Lenovo continues to prove itself as a leader in innovation, technology and sustainability. Its commitment to supporting a transition to a lower carbon economy is further demonstrated by the savings the new LTS process brings. Furthermore, in 2018 Lenovo intends to offer the new procedure for use on an industry-wide basis free of charge.

About Lenovo 

Lenovo is a $45 billion global Fortune 500 company and a leader in providing innovative consumer, commercial, and enterprise technology. Our portfolio of high-quality, secure products and services covers PCs (including the legendary Think and multimode Yoga brands), workstations, servers, storage, smart TVs and a family of mobile products like smartphones (including the Moto brand), tablets and apps.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Cavity Board SMT Assembly Challenges (Part 1)

06/26/2019 | By Dudi Amir and Brett Grossman, Intel Corp.
The concept behind Component-in-Cavity (CiC) is straightforward. If the tallest component(s) on the motherboard can be placed into a recession created in the motherboard, their thickness relative to the components on the surface of the PCB will thus effectively be reduced. While this concept may be straightforward, its implementation is not. That implementation is the focus of this paper. Read on.

Impact of Stencil Foil Type on Solder Paste Transfer Efficiency for Laser-cut SMT Stencils (Part 1)

04/24/2019 | Greg Smith, BlueRing Stencils
As innovation and demand continue to drive miniaturization in electronics, manufacturers face the constant challenge of assembling smaller and smaller components with repeatable processes and high yields. Stencil printing is the first step in the PWB assembly process, and improvements to the SMT stencil can significantly improve yields, especially for more challenging miniaturized products.

SMTA Europe Electronics in Harsh Environments Conference 2019: A Preview

03/26/2019 | Pete Starkey, I-Connect007
As a prelude to this year's Electronics in Harsh Environments conference, which will be held on April 2–4, 2019 in Amsterdam, Netherlands, SMTA Europe chairman Keith Bryant, supported by technical specialist Bob Willis, showcased the challenges and key issues faced by design and process engineers worldwide, in a webinar entitled "Harsh Environment Failures—Causes & Cures."



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.