Creation Technologies Gains Fourth AS9100 Certified Manufacturing Facility


Reading time ( words)

EMS firm Creation Technologies' manufacturing facility in Vancouver, B.C. Canada has obtained AS9100 Certification. The news comes on the heels of the company’s recent certifications of their manufacturing facilities in San Jose, California; Dallas, Texas; and Mississauga, Ontario.

"We are extremely proud of this accomplishment," said Mark Krzyczkowski, VP and General Manager. "The AS9100 certification is the standard to which aerospace and defense suppliers are measured. This accomplishment is proof of our continuous improvement efforts and assurances made by our team to deliver the highest quality standards and a continued commitment to manufacturing excellence."

The aerospace and defense industry is highly regulated and demands the highest level of quality standards for the development and manufacture of products. This AS9100 Quality Management System (QMS) standard is widely adopted to promote continuous product and process improvement in the aerospace and defense industry.

"This is another milestone in our effort to serve those market segments that we feel are integral to the growth of our business," said Joe Garcia, Vice President of Business Development. "This achievement is a testament to the hard work and effort that has gone into building a world class quality system and something which we take great pride in obtaining. We look forward to continued growth of our current and potential new customers in the military, defense and security markets."

About Creation Technologies

Creation Technologies is an Electronics Manufacturing Services (EMS) provider focused on building premier customer relationships with companies in the Instrumentation & Industrial, Medical, Wireless & Communications, Security & Environment, Defense, Multimedia & Computers and Transportation markets.

Creation provides start-to-finish manufacturing and supply chain solutions—from design and new product development to final integration, product distribution and after-market services—to its customers across North America and worldwide.

The company of approximately 3,000 people operates 10 Manufacturing Facilities, 2 Design Centers and 2 Rapid Prototyping Centers with locations in British Columbia, California, Colorado, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ontario, Mexico and China.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Book Excerpt: The Printed Circuit Assembler’s Guide to Smart Data, Chapter 1

12/30/2020 | Sagi Reuven and Zac Elliott, Siemens Digital Industries Software
Accurate data is required to adjust processes and to ensure quality over time. This is difficult because not all data is in the same format, and not all sensors perform the same over time. How do you know what the best data to collect is and how to filter out the junk data from useful or smart data? This is not an easy task when the interfaces to data collection sources are complex, and they do not speak the same language, often requiring the vendor’s help to get data out of the machine and then spending time normalizing the data to turn it into something useful. This is a challenge for companies trying to set up a custom data collection system themselves.

Book Excerpt: The Printed Circuit Assembler’s Guide to Smart Data

12/16/2020 | Sagi Reuven and Zac Elliott, Siemens Digital Industries Software
Whenever we discuss data, keep in mind that people have been collecting data, verifying it, and translating it into reports for a long time. And if data is collected and processes are changed automatically, people still will be interpreting and verifying the accuracy of the data, creating reports, making recommendations, solving problems, tweaking, improving, and innovating. Whatever data collection system is used, any effort to digitalize needs to engage and empower the production team at the factory. Their role is to attend to the manufacturing process but also to act as the front line of communications and control.

Lorain County Community College’s Successful MEMS Program

12/07/2020 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
The I-Connect007 editorial team had the pleasure of an extended and detailed conversation with Johnny Vanderford and Courtney Tenhover from Lorain County Community College (LCCC). Vanderford and Tenhover are at the heart of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) program at LCCC that is emerging as a model for a successful technical higher-education program. This conversation was lively, and the enthusiasm at LCCC is infectious, as it should be; their results are impressive.



Copyright © 2021 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.