Universal’s Training Center Delivers eLearning Through Online Courses


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Universal Instruments’ Training Center is supplementing its course portfolio with the addition of a series of online training courses, initially targeting a suite of modules for machine operators. The new courses will provide the practical skills needed to efficiently operate the company’s lineup of electronics assembly equipment. In order to enroll, students can simply register through Universal’s website for the courses of their choice and remotely participate in the targeted interactive training.
 
With more than 50 years’ experience in the electronics assembly industry, Universal has evolved its Training Center to help customers get the most out of their assembly equipment investment, including optimizing productivity, machine utilization and performance. By providing eLearning in addition to training at the Universal facility and on-site training, the company now offers a full complement of training options.

“This is an opportunity to bring a contemporary training vehicle to our customer base,” said Scott Gerhart, Universal Instruments Vice President, Global Services. “By putting a variety of course material at their fingertips, we’re making this critical knowledge more accessible than ever.”

“We’re also working with many of our customers to become a standardized part of their onboarding processes to help streamline training for new operators and ensure that they’re able to safely and effectively run the equipment,” added Gerhart. “This a powerful advantage, particularly with tight labor markets that typically include a higher operator turnover rate.”

Universal’s online training courses will be available beginning Q1 2018. Select courses will be offered with new material made available throughout the year.

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