TopLine Granted Patent for Quick Response Vibration Damping


Reading time ( words)

TopLine Corporation has been granted US Patent 10,021,779 for an apparatus and system for attaining a quick response to vibration damping of printed circuit boards (PCB) or other planar surfaces. The patent covers the use of a single spherical tungsten (or other material) ball in a single or plurality of sealed spherical chambers in a Particle Impact Damper (PID). Vibration damping of PC board assemblies increases the life of the system for applications in harsh environments.

“The single spherical ball is not weighed down, thus providing unrestricted freedom for the ball to quickly respond at the first occurrence of excessive vibrational acceleration of 1G,” said Martin Hart, CEO of TopLine Corporation.

The structure of a single spherical particle within a sealed spherical chamber provides a path of minimum distance for the ball to travel before colliding with the ceiling or side walls of the PID chamber. A plurality of spherical chambers can be arranged in a variety of patterns within the PID housing as desired.

The PID housing can be any shape such as a cube, a rectangle, a cylinder, a sphere, a triangular tetrahedron, polygon, toroid or in any combination of shapes. TopLine holds several patents in the field of particle dampers.

About Particle Impact Dampers (PID)

Particle Impact Dampers (PID) reduce harmful vibration and extend hardware life and reliability. PID is a COTS commercially-available standard solution, suitable for retrofitting and hardening heritage hardware in the field. PIDs can be solder attached like ordinary components or attached to the board using permanent epoxy adhesive. TopLine’s Particle Impact Dampers were invented at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. TopLine has created a web site with a 2-minute YouTube video showing how the PID works; Please click here.

For more information please download here.

 

 

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Tips & Tricks: Water Contamination and Flux Expiry

04/17/2019 | Jason Fullerton, MacDermid Alpha Electronics Solutions
Solder joints that form properly are not expected to exhibit reduced reliability. However, a higher number of defects created tends to lead to a higher chance that defective connections escape detection through inspection and functional testing, and that’s not a risk to be taken lightly.

Tips & Tricks: Humidity Level for Electronics Assembly

04/10/2019 | Jason Fullerton, MacDermid Alpha Electronics Solutions
Low relative humidity (RH) can allow for higher static charges to build on objects. It can also affect solder pastes, especially OR-class pastes, and this can reduce print performance and stencil life. Read on to find out what level of RH you need for your assembly facility.

IPC Working to Revive Lead-Free R&D in High-Reliability Sectors

04/10/2019 | Chris Mitchell, IPC VP, Global Government Relations
Ask yourself the following question: Why is it that the aerospace, defense and high performance (ADHP) electronics sectors remain reliant on lead solders and components even as the commercial sector has largely phased out their use?



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.