IPC Issues Call for Papers for Third Annual IPC High Reliability Forum


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IPC — Association Connecting Electronics Industries invites engineers, researchers, academics, technical experts and industry leaders to submit abstracts for IPC High Reliability Forum to be held May 14–16, 2019 in Hanover (Baltimore), Maryland.

IPC High Reliability Forum provides presenters and their companies with a notable and cost-effective opportunity to promote their expertise and gain visibility with key engineers, managers and executives across the electronics industry supply chain. Staff from companies such as NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Honeywell Aerospace, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, Motorola and Raytheon have presented papers at past IPC High Reliability Forums.

With a focus on electronics subjected to harsh use environments, expert papers and presentations are being sought on the following topics:

  • Mechanical stress reliability - vibration and shock Methods (software) for predicting reliability
  • Failure Modes Effects Analysis (FMEA)
  • Thermal Mitigation
  • Thermal Stress Test Methods
  • HDI Reliability
  • Microvia Failures and Testing Methods
  • Microvia Reliability
  • Design for Reliability
  • Design Rules for Spacing and Staggered Vias
  • Failures Related to Laminate Materials
  • Materials Compatibility
  • System-level effects on Solder Joint Reliability
  • Assembly Tests for Solder Joint Reliability

Abstracts summarizing original and previously unpublished work must be submitted for consideration to present. Presentations should be non-commercial and describe significant results from experiments, emphasize new techniques, discuss trends of interest and contain technical and/or appropriate test results. Final presentations should be 45 minutes in length, including time for questions and answers.

About IPC

IPC is a global industry association based in Bannockburn, Illinois, dedicated to the competitive excellence and financial success of its 4,400+ member company sites which represent all facets of the electronics industry, including design, printed board manufacturing, electronics assembly and test. As a member-driven organization and leading source for industry standards, training, market research and public policy advocacy, IPC supports programs to meet the needs of an estimated $2 trillion global electronics industry. IPC maintains additional offices in Taos, N.M.; Washington, D.C.; Atlanta, Ga.; Brussels, Belgium; Stockholm, Sweden; Moscow, Russia; Bangalore and New Delhi, India; Bangkok, Thailand; and Qingdao, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Suzhou and Beijing, China.

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