Metallurgist Josh Montenegro Joins Conecsus


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Josh Montenegro joins Conecsus as process engineer at Conecsus, LLC, it is announced today. Conecsus is a world-leading ‘green’ refiner and recycler of metals wastes from a variety of industries. Josh, originally from Colorado, graduated with a Masters of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering from the Colorado School of Mines in 2009, with a focus on extractive metallurgy.

Before joining Conecsus, he served as a Process Engineer and Process Manager for companies involved in R&D, smelting, refining, and alloying practices of the lead-acid battery recycling industry, as well as E-Waste plasma smelting. He acquired considerable knowledge and valuable experience that he will apply in his new position at Conecsus.

“In my previous positions, I’ve managed Furnace Control Room operations and worked directly under the Chief of Operations to understand and develop the process for the recovery of Cu, Au, and Ag,” Josh relates. “Now, here in Terrell, I’m helping to further the smelting, refining, and distillation processes to discover new ways to make the process more efficient and increase recoveries for tin bearing by-products.”

“Working with operations, and seeing my work positively affecting the process from both production and financial perspectives, lets me know that I am contributing to Conecsus, to my fellow employees, and to a greener world.” 

About Conecsus

Founded in 1980, Conecsus, LLC is a sophisticated ‘green’ recycler and refiner of SMT solder/solder paste wastes and residues, as well as Tin, Tin-Zinc, Lead, Silver, Gold, and Copper from a variety of manufacturing industries. Located in Terrell, Texas, USA, Conecsus converts these wastes into usable metal products. Conecsus’ mission is to provide innovative and high-quality industrial byproducts management, metal recovery, and recycling options that provide world-class value and service to our customers, and display respect and stewardship toward the environment. For more information, click here.

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