Benefits of Jet Printing Solder Pastes


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In a recent I-Connect007 survey on jet printing solder pastes, we asked the following question: "What are the major benefits with jet printing solder pastes?" Here are just a few of the replies, slightly edited for clarity.

Erik Widding, Birger Engineering Inc.: "No stencils and immediate ability to vary paste volumes anywhere on the PCB. Also, very little wasted material, as none is exposed to the environment until after dispense."

Jason Nipper, UTC: "Ability to selectively print without Kapton taping apertures on stencil. No need for stencil, good for test and NPI development."

Stephan Kohler, Turck: "Rapid prototyping."

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