Blackfox on IPC Training and Certification and Mexico Expansion


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Joel Sainz, sales manager for Blackfox Training Institute in Mexico, speaks with Guest Editor Osvaldo Targon about his company’s IPC training and certification services during IPC APEX EXPO 2019. Sainz also discusses their plans for expanding their reach in Mexico.

Osvaldo Targon: Good day, Joel. Can you kindly tell us a bit about your job, your company, and where you’re based?

Joel Sainz: Thank you so much for this opportunity. Blackfox Training Institute provides training and certifications on IPC standards worldwide. The company’s corporate office is headquartered in Longmont, Colorado. However, we do have branches in Mexico, Singapore, and Malaysia, among others. We have training facilities, but we also work directly with our clients. We provide training everywhere, not just in our own facilities.

Targon: That’s interesting because that gives you a chance to take a closer look at what your clients are doing while you train them.

Sainz: Definitely. We not only do this in Mexico but also in all of Latin America and even Spain. Wherever people need our training in the Spanish language, we’ll be there.

Targon: Is Mexico the main branch for all of Latin America to get in touch with you?

Sainz: Yes.

Targon: What your company does is very important because it allows people to get certified.

Sainz: Right. Blackfox has been in the market for 23 years and is one of the most famous IPC training centers in the world. We’re the only training center that’s up to date with all regulations, so we’re there for everyone, everywhere.

Targon: What are your thoughts on being here at IPC APEX EXPO 2019?

Sainz: We’re happy about it. It has been a great show. We’re getting a lot of information from IPC, and there are so many interesting and relevant changes. Being here gives us an opportunity to expand and to be there for all of the companies that might need our services. Blackfox has been coming to this show for 23 years, so we have a lot of history with IPC APEX EXPO.

Targon: Where in Mexico are you based?

Sainz: We’re currently based in Guadalajara, but we’re about to expand and open more offices in Mexico. We still haven’t decided where, but that will happen.

Targon: Guadalajara is an industrial town, isn’t it?

Sainz: Yes. Until recently, Guadalajara was considered the Silicon Valley of Mexico. However, some things have changed.

Targon: I was able to be there a few years ago for the expo that took place there. Do they still do it?

Sainz: Definitely. There are huge electronics manufacturers in Guadalajara like Flextronics, Jabil, or Continental. I was at the Mexitrónica show in Guadalajara, but it’s over.

Targon: It’s no longer open.

Sainz: Correct, but there are also SMTA expos that appeal to the industry there. Nevertheless, I think we need more expos like this one. We’re working on that.

Targon: We have to say goodbye, Joel. It’s always a pleasure. I-Connect007 is always spreading the word about this kind of work, and our readers will be happy to hear from you. Thank you very much for your time, Joel.

Sainz: Thank you.

Editor’s note: This was originally posted as a Real Time with… IPC APEX EXPO 2019 Spanish-language interview and has been translated and edited for clarity. Click here to see the video, and also check out I-Connect007’s time-lapse of the show floor, including Blackfox’s booth at IPC APEX EXPO 2019.

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