Rehm Offers Different Types of Cooling for VisionXP+


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To ensure an optimal soldering result, the soldering process needs a stable and reliable cooling process. Which is why Rehm Thermal Systems VisionXP+ convection soldering system features a standard cooling with four cooling modules; an extended cooling section (Power Cooling Unit); and a CoolFlow option, which is an innovative cooling system using liquid nitrogen.

The standard cooling system installed in all VisionX convection soldering systems consists of up to four individual cooling modules to allow a precisely controlled cooling process as well as individual adjustment of the cooling gradient.

rehm2.jpgFor gentle cooling, especially for complex assemblies, an extended cooling section (Power Cooling Unit) can be connected to the VisionXP+. This can be implemented as an extension to standard cooling zones under a nitrogen atmosphere or as a separate, downstream module in an air atmosphere for higher cooling performance for insensitive materials. Advantage of the air-cooled variant: while nitrogen is needed in the process section of the convection unit to prevent oxidation, the extended cooling section no longer needs to be flooded with nitrogen, resulting in nitrogen savings.

For particularly massive or large assemblies or boards with product carriers, the VisionXP + can also be equipped with underside cooling. The actual cooling process is identical to that of the standard cooling section, but the extracted, cleaned and cooled air flows not only from above onto the module, but also from below.

Rehm also offers an energy-saving cooling variant for the VisionXP+: the air is extracted at several points rather than just one. This results in gradual cooling and offers significant energy saving potential.

rehm3.jpgThe CoolFlow system, meanwhile, is developed with partner Air Liquide. CoolFlow uses the nitrogen used for inertia even more efficiently. The -196°C liquid nitrogen releases its energy in the cooling section, then evaporates and can then be used in its gaseous state for inerting the process atmosphere. The cooling water, which previously required high energy use for cooling, including cooling unit and refrigerant, is completely eliminated.

About Rehm Thermal Systems

Rehm is a technology and innovation leader in the state-of-the-art, cost-effective manufacturing of electronic assembly groups and specialises in thermal system solutions for the electronics and photovoltaics industry. Rehm is a globally active manufacturer of reflow soldering systems using convection, condensation or vacuum, drying and coating systems, functional test systems, equipment for the metallisation of solar cells as well as numerous customised systems. We have a presence in all key growth markets and, as a partner with almost 30 years of industry experience, we are able to implement innovative production solutions that set new standards.

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