SMTA/CALCE Announce Program for Symposium on Counterfeit Parts and Materials


Reading time ( words)

The SMTA and the Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering (CALCE) announce the technical program for the Symposium on Counterfeit Parts and Materials this June 25-27, 2019 in College Park, Maryland.

The symposium will commence on Tuesday, June 25 with sessions on industry standards, regulations, counterfeit batteries, and inspection that will feature presentations and a panel discussion from BAE, ERAI, GIDEP, Lockheed Martin, SAE and prominent research universities among others. 

The second day of the symposium will focus on process concerns, cyber physical system security, information security, and technology solutions. Presentations are scheduled from companies including Georgia Tech, IBM, IDA, SMT Corporation, Swissmic, US Navy and more.

Thursday, June 27, is dedicated to a full day workshop on the Use of Component Documentation and Supply Chain for Counterfeit Avoidance and a half day workshop on Utilizing IPC-1782—component traceability.

The information presented at this symposium is valuable to quality and reliability managers, supply chain managers, brand protection specialists, inspectors, marketing and procurement policy makers, contracts and legal management, security specialists and government agencies.

About SMTA

The SMTA membership is an international network of professionals who build skills, share practical experience and develop solutions in electronic assembly technologies, including microsystems, emerging technologies, and related business operations.

About CALCE

The Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering (CALCE), the largest electronic products and systems research center focused on electronics reliability, is dedicated to providing a knowledge and resource base to support the development of competitive electronic components, products and systems.

Share

Print


Suggested Items

Optimizing Solder Paste Volume for Low-Temperature Reflow of BGA Packages

07/22/2019 | Keith Sweatman, Nihon Superior Co. Ltd
In this article, Keith Sweatman explains how the volume of low-melting-point alloy paste—which delivers the optimum proportion of retained ball alloy for a particular reflow temperature—can be determined by reference to the phase diagrams of the ball and paste alloys.

Approaches to Overcome Nodules and Scratches on Wire-Bondable Plating on PCBs

07/17/2019 | Young K. Song and Vanja Bukva, Teledyne Dalsa Inc., and Ryan Wong, FTG Circuits
Initially adopted internal specifications for acceptance of printed circuit boards (PCBs) used for wire bonding was that there were no nodules or scratches allowed on the wirebond pads when inspected under 20X magnification. This paper details if wire bonding could be successfully performed over nodules and scratches and if there was a dimensional threshold where wire bonding could be successful.

Practical Implementation of Assembly Processes for Low Melting Point Solder Pastes (Part 1)

07/16/2019 | Adam Murling, Miloš Lazić, and Don Wood, Indium Corporation; and Martin Anselm, Rochester Institute of Technology
Since 2006 and the implementation of the RoHS directive, the interest in bismuth-tin solder alloys—whose melting point around 140°C is very desirable because it allows for the use of lower temperature laminate materials and reduces thermal stress on sensitive components—has only increased as the industry has searched for Pb-free alternatives to the chosen standard, SAC305, which melts at considerably higher temperatures than the incumbent tin-lead alloys.



Copyright © 2019 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.