TopLine MCS Reliability Solution Published in NASA SPINOFF


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TopLine’s innovative Micro-coil Springs (MCS Series) have been featured in NASA’s 2019 edition of SPINOFF, the annual Information Technology publication of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program. A full-page feature titled “Tiny Springs Improve Electronic Reliability” describes the MCS innovation on page 137.

Micro-coil springs are a novel interconnect for CCGA (Ceramic Column Grid Array) IC packages for harsh environments, where they can absorb extreme shock of up to 50,000g before failing. Commercial applications include aerospace, avionics, military, down-hole oilfield drilling and automotive electronics.

Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center developed this unique interconnection structure for integrated circuit packages. This innovation replaces traditional CCGA solder columns with the potential to extend life under harsh environments, extreme thermal stress, vibration and shock. Working with TopLine engineers, NASA granted an exclusive license to TopLine to manufacture and sell the MCS product, which may also be used in place of solder balls on plastic PBGA packages.

TopLine CEO Martin Hart said that “The applications include anywhere that there are large temperature swings,” but notes, “We’re still at the beginning of discovering the market.” But he says that the NASA origins have helped open doors. “When the customer realizes that the invention was made at NASA, they’re more willing to listen, read about it, consider buying it.”

About TopLine

TopLine manufactures a wide range of daisy chain semiconductor packages for process development, experimentation, machine evaluation, solder training, and SMT assembly practice. TopLine products provide hands-on learning for engineers.  

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