Help Us Help You: Does Your Company Use Any of These Chemicals?


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IPC is seeking insights from its members regarding the use of several specific chemicals in their operations. From now through the end of December, the U.S. EPA will release draft risk evaluations for 10 chemicals. IPC will have opportunities to engage with policy makers during this period and submit comments for the public record.

The chemicals are:
• Asbestos, Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CASRN): 1332-21-4
• 1-Bromopropane, CASRN: 106-94-5;
• Carbon Tetrachloride, CASRN: 56-23-5;
• 1,4-Dioxane, CASRN: 123-91-1;
• Cyclic Aliphatic Bromide Cluster (HBCD), CASRNs: 25637-99-4; 3194-55-6; and 3194-57-8;
• Methylene Chloride, CASRN: 75-09-2
• N-Methylpyrrolidone, CASRN: 872-50-4
• Perchloroethylene, CASRN: 127-18-4
• Pigment Violet 29, CASRN: 81-33-4
• Trichloroethylene, CASRN: 79-01-6

The EPA will use the information received from the public—including IPC and its member companies—to inform the final risk evaluations for these chemicals as required under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Section 6(b). The purpose of a risk evaluation is to determine whether a chemical presents an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment under normal conditions of use. To that end, each risk evaluation includes hazard and exposure assessments, risk characterization, and a risk determination.

Please help IPC’s government relations team help you by letting me know how you use these chemicals in your electronics processing activities.

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