ifm Relies on Automated Component Storage from Totech


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Totech today announced another strong partnership with ifm electronic GmbH, a global progressive sensor and automation company, headquartered in Germany.  The Totech Dry Tower, a fully automated SMD warehouse, will be installed at the ifm electronic Bechlingen location in Tettnang at the beginning of next year.

After several months of intensive project work with the ifm team, an exciting concept has been finalised that meets the technical requirements of modern SMD production and, at the same time, offers great savings potential.

Brief summary of the overall Dry Tower project:

  • Dimensions of the storage system (LxWxH): 4.1mx5.3mx6m, with space for up to 13,000 reels of mixed sizes.
  • The future-proofing option of doubling the storage area is accounted for with the modular design.
  • The Dry Tower will be erected on the 1st floor above the set-up area to save storage space.
  • Storage is via trolleys with space for up to 60 reels.
  • A total of up to 4 set-up stations are supplied with material.
  • The material is removed from storage in accordance with a defined optimum setup sequence.
  • The MSL open times are stopped and logged in the Dry Tower - expired reels are blocked for retrieval until floor life has been reset.
  • Expired MSL components are actively dried in the Dry Tower and only then released for production.
  • Software interfaces to ASM, Fuji and ifm internal software applications.

According to Bernhard Joos, Head of Department for Central Prefabrication at ifm electronic GmbH and the person responsible for the project, there were several key criteria which drove the investment in Totech's Dry Tower; High efficiency and stability in the storage and set-up processes; High storage volume/area; Modular design and resulting scalability; and Controlled MSL processes.

After completion of a new logistics hall, the installation is planned for the first quarter of 2020.

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