This Month in SMT007 Magazine—IBM: Supply Chain Blockchain


Reading time ( words)

IBM’s Michelle Lam and Christophe Begue, along with Nolan Johnson, discuss the basics of blockchain, and how it enables a more secure and traceable supply chain. They also address some of the applications for this technology and what the future holds.

Nolan Johnson: Maybe we could start with an introduction from each of you, your background, and your title?

Michelle Lam: I’m a senior technical staff member in IBM’s System Supply Chain Engineering organization. Among many roles I have, counterfeit prevention program manager is one that got me into working on blockchain.

Christophe Begue: I’m the director of solution strategy in the industry team for the electronics industry at IBM. My job is to bring the various things that IBM does, and solutions from our partners, and package them together to specifically address the various needs of our clients—which spans from semiconductor to consumer electronics.

Johnson: That’s exactly the space that we’re hoping to talk about—the electronics supply. For those of us who don’t really know, what is blockchain? What does it do, and why is it good for this sort of application?

Begue: Blockchain is, at its core, a shared ledger. It’s a way to record a transaction that involves multiple parties in a ledger, which is shared by these parties. Instead of recording your accounting transaction with another partner—which is recorded when completed in two separate ledgers—here is a ledger that accounts for the transaction that brings you two together. In the life of doing business, you and this other party do business with many other parties. If you design the blockchain to include all these different parties, there would be this ledger which records the set of transactions that brings two or multiple parties together as they relate to each other. It’s novel because of the way it reaches across multiple organizations and manages the information, security, and immutability. Its record of history cannot be changed, so it’s a new way of looking at multiparty processes and transactions.

Lam: Christophe summarized it very well, but I want to add that there are so many different types of blockchains. The one we’re talking about is the permissioned blockchain, instead of the permissionless, anonymous blockchain where anyone—even if they don’t know each other—can join.

Begue: That’s a very important point. Here, we’re discussing the use of blockchain in the context of business processes and enterprises, which are dealing with each other. They have names, locations, and reasons for doing business. We’re not talking about cryptocurrencies and anonymous participants.

To read this entire conversation, which appeared in the August 2020 issue of SMT007 Magazine, click here.

Share




Suggested Items

The CMMC 2.0 Countdown: Will You Be Ready When the Clock Hits Zero?

08/16/2022 | Divyash Patel, MX2 Technology
If you influence IT decisions at your workplace, you need to hear this. If you make the decisions, you need to listen, not just hear: Unless you start acting on CMMC compliance now, you are putting yourself at a disadvantage—one that will take much more time to correct than you might expect. Think of me as a spokesperson for the industry I represent: we are concerned about you. From what I’ve heard and seen over the last few months, too many of you are listening to suppliers, upstream and downstream partners, or other business owners on how seriously to take CMMC. As a result, far too much wishful thinking is guiding decision-making. So, listen to the experts.

Business Email Compromise: The $43 Billion Scam

08/10/2022 | Federal Bureau of Investigation
Business email compromise/email account compromise (BEC/EAC) is a sophisticated scam that targets both businesses and individuals who perform legitimate transfer-of-funds requests. The scam is frequently carried out when an individual compromises legitimate business or personal email accounts through social engineering or computer intrusion to conduct unauthorized transfers of funds. The scam is not always associated with a transfer-of-funds request. One variation involves compromising legitimate business email accounts and requesting employees’ Personally Identifiable Information, Wage and Tax Statement (W-2) forms, or even crypto currency wallets.

SMTA Dallas Expo: A Novel Approach to Outsourcing Sales

04/27/2022 | Andy Shaughnessy, Design007 Magazine
Caleb Townsend is the co-founder of Factur, a new kind of recruiting agency that specializes in filling marketing and sales positions. I met with Caleb at SMTA Dallas and asked him to discuss the creative ways he’s helping contract manufacturers to practice Lean principles in their sales department. As Caleb says, his company helps sales departments embrace methods similar to those used on the shop floor, which sometimes means updating their filing system from a “shoebox full of business cards.”



Copyright © 2022 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.