5 Keys to Smart Process Success


Reading time ( words)

Introduction 
It can be challenging to stay current with the vernacular of our industry; terms like IoT, M2M, Industry 4.0 and smart processes appear in just about every publication we see. Buzzwords aside, the substance behind these technologies is here to stay and driving this fourth-generation industrial revolution.

Next-Gen Manufacturing
If we accept that Industry 3.0 is defined as the computerization and automation of factory floor processes to make them “smart,” then I suggest that Industry 4.0 is defined as the expansion of this idea to include all the support processes required to manufacture a quality product. By connecting factory-floor computers with all the logistic-based computers throughout the supply chain, Industry 4.0 will revolutionize how companies make stuff. Adding in smart algorithms, machine learning and customer connectivity will transform our current linear/sequential processing into the next generation of “smart processes.” For this to occur, the five characteristics below are critical for a successful transition.

1. IIoT
Smart factories require the core underlying processes to be connected and “talking” to generate the data necessary to make real-time process decisions, that is, the IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things). In a truly connected factory, an ongoing continuous dialog between machines, business processes, suppliers and customers is happening in the background. This dialog is not only interactive, but proactive, as a constant stream of real-time data is tweaking and adjusting processes to drive improvement. It also provides time-critical information on how processes are operating, supply chain pipeline, and delivery status updates—all based on data. When starting this journey, it is important to utilize the right technology, data, and analytics infrastructure for your business model. You will need to re-imagine your processes from end-to-end for software interoperability, data management, speed, and scalability as your IIoT initiative grows and matures.

2. Cyber Physical Systems
Cyber physical systems are the integration of computers, networking and physical processes. Computers and networks monitor and control physical processes with feedback loops; the physical system reacts; the system uses software to interpret actions and tracks results. This system is based on embedded computers and software in devices, not for traditional data computation, but rather as a loop of action and machine learning. The smart factory is a flexible system enhanced by augmented intelligence that can self-optimize performance across a broader network. A cyber physical system can self-adapt to and learn from new conditions in real or near-real time, and autonomously run entire production processes.

To read this entire article, which appeared in the January 2021 issue of SMT007 Magazine, click here.

 

Share

Print


Suggested Items

ProMetrics: An Easy, Smart Solution

01/05/2022 | I-Connect007 Editorial Team
Rehm's Michael Hanke speaks about the product on process and the advantages of live process monitoring with ProMetrics, Rehm’s newest monitoring tool, which is brand new and unique in the market. Users say that it’s easy to use and, more importantly, that it provides the security in a system they are looking for.

SMTAI 2021: Rob DiMatteo Turns Up the Heat at BTU

12/15/2021 | Nolan Johnson, I-Connect007
At SMTA International 2021, Nolan Johnson spoke with Rob DiMatteo of BTU International about the current shift in market drivers, pain points from customers, and what he expects to see in the near future. Chip shortages and port delays are just two of the challenges facing BTU’s customers. As general manager of BTU, DiMatteo wants his company to excel at customer service despite these challenges. He also previews a new flux management technology for keeping reflow ovens extremely clean, calling it a significant breakthrough.

Driving Down Cost in the Supply Chain

04/08/2021 | Meghan Zou, EPOCH
Driving cost out of the supply chain goes beyond reduction of raw material cost. Though many of the manufacturers today concentrate on negotiation with their raw material supplier(s) the hidden cost of internal supply chain goes undetected. To address the cost of the entire supply chain we should not only look at direct material cost but also the cost of internal supply chain. At Epoch we looked at four areas in particular which include: planning/tracking, storage/delivery, inventory management, and supplier relationships.



Copyright © 2022 I-Connect007. All rights reserved.