PNC Improves Manufacturing Capabilities with Ersa Selective Wave Solder


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PNC Inc. has improved its manufacturing capabilities with the recent purchase of an ECOSELECT 2 selective wave solder machine manufactured by Ersa.

In today's advancing technological climate, boards are more frequently being designed with a high concentration of mixed technologies. A selective wave solder machine has many advantages over a traditional wave soldering machine which made this an appropriate investment for PNC to make.

Not only is a selective solder cleaner in terms of less flux residue being left on the board's surface, it is also more economical due to the reduced amount of flux used. Instead of passing over a wave of molten solder introducing the board to another heat cycle, these machines have nozzles that are programmed to only put solder where needed. As a result, the flux that precedes the solder is also only placed where needed, which in turn leads to a cleaner board. Once programmed, a selective wave solder can cut down on hours of manual through-hole soldering.

"The acquisition of the Ersa ECOSELECT 2 Selective Wave Solder is in keeping with our philosophy of providing the best quality under the Total Concept model while still maintaining some semblance of cost efficiency. By adopting the Total Concept, we have been able to provide our customers with a full suite of quality printed circuit board solutions under one roof," said President and CEO Sam Sangani.

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