STI Electronics to Present on the New J-STD-001 Section 8.1 on Electronic Assembly Cleanliness


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STI’s Mark McMeen, VP, Engineering Services, will have a special presentation on How does one collect “Objective Evidence” to meet the new J-STD-001 Section 8.1 on electronic assembly cleanliness?  The presentation take place at STI Electronics Inc.’s facility in Madison, AL on March 26, 2020 at 3 p.m. and will explore why this IPC standard came about and why the current “ROSE” test methodology is not enough for today’s advanced designs. It will explore different tools and techniques as well as discuss how to gather objective evidence needed to meet the specification. There will be an actual demonstration of the equipment and test reports that are generated by the SIR test equipment along with the actual hardware that generates the test data that supports “Objective Evidence” for review. Do you know how “clean or dirty” your electronic manufacturing process and resulting hardware/assemblies are at completion?

Mark T. McMeen joined STI Electronics Inc. as Vice President of Engineering Services in July 2000. Prior to joining STI, Mr. McMeen was the Vice President of Engineering and Technical Director of Component Intertechnologies, Inc. He currently oversees the daily operations of the Engineering Services division of STI, which incorporates three entities: Analytical, Prototype and Manufacturing and Microelectronics Lab. He has more than 30 years of experience in the engineering and manufacturing of printed circuit boards, both flexible and rigid, as well as in the manufacture of electronic assemblies. He currently holds two co-patents in the fabrication of flexible circuit boards and the processes necessary to imbed integrated circuits inside rigid printed circuit boards. He is also one of the co-inventers in the development of the Magnalytix commercially available SIR test equipment (Magnalytix is a joint venture between STI Electronics and KYZEN).

 

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