Seika Launches IC Packages and LEDs Can Be Stored in a Dry Storage Cabinet for Indefinite Floor Life


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Seika Machinery, Inc. is pleased to announce that IC packages and LEDs can be stored in a dry box at five percent RH or less for indefinite floor life. Five of the McDry storage cabinets offer less than one percent RH, including: DXU-1001, MCU-201, MCU-301, MCU-401 and the DXU-580SF Feeder Storage Cabinet.

When IC package and chip LEDs are left on the pick-and-place, they will absorb moisture from the atmosphere and may popcorn due to heat expansion in the reflow process. The floor life can be stopped when IC packages and chip LEDs are stored in a dry cabinet capable of maintaining 5 percent RH or less by following the IPC/JEDEC J-STD 033C guidelines.

McDry dry boxes, dry cabinets and desiccators provide optimal ultra-low humidity and moisture-proof storage for IC packages. Moisture-sensitive components – when safely and properly stored in McDry – have an indefinite floor-life and micro-cracking or pop-corning during the reflow process is not an issue.

Other storage applications for McDry include original prints, printed wiring boards (PWBs), polymide film, tape reels, feeders and various electronic components and materials. McDry cabinets conform to IPC/JEDEC J-STD 033C and IPC 1601 Guidelines.

About Seika Machinery, Inc.

Seika Machinery, Inc. (SMI) is a subsidiary of Seika Corporation, Japan and member of the Mitsubishi Global Group. SMI provides electronics manufacturers with advanced machinery, superior materials and engineering services.

For more information about the system or Seika’s complete product line, click here.

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