Stadium Group Partners with Maker Life


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Stadium Group has announced a partnership with Maker Life, a developer and provider of simple build-your-own computer project kits designed to educate parents, teachers and children around the world about programming. The kits are being developed using the low-cost, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi Zero W and BBC micro:bit single board computers (SBCs). Stadium is the exclusive manufacturer of power and cable products for the Raspberry Pi-based Maker Life kits.

To help children of primary school age understand and engage in programming and coding, to address the future need for these skills in the fast-growing global digital economy, Maker Life has collaborated with parents, educators and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) coordinators to create kits that offer a fun introduction to projects such as building a clock or a weather station. Each kit contains all of the components needed to complete the project, including power supply and cables, and is easy to assemble using a simple step-by-step guide, with no soldering required. Currently available in English language, bespoke localised language versions will follow in the coming months where volume allows. The range of kits is set to grow rapidly over the course of the next two years, with up to 45 variations available by the ed of 2019 compared to the four available today.

This rapid growth plan requires an effective supply chain with the flexibility and ability to deliver to scale across international markets. As the manufacturer of the official Raspberry Pi power supply, Stadium is already well established in the industrial SBC market, with the capability to service customers globally.

Charlie Peppiatt, Stadium CEO, commented: “It is important that industry steps up to the challenge of inspiring the next generation of programmers, to ensure that the right skills are available to manage the demand for future technologies in this increasingly digital world. The Maker Life kits are a simple, affordable and appealing way to get children interested from an early age, and we are pleased to be part of a commercial partnership with this goal at its heart.”

“James Downes, Maker Life Founder, said: “We have an ambitious goal to educate children globally through our programming kits, and our success relies on the support of dependable business partners. Stadium not only has the design and manufacturing capability to deliver the cables and power supplies that are an essential part of the kits, but is also a great advocate of the urgent need to engage with children in a fun and inspiring way, to fulfil the world’s future programming needs.”

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