Parpro Expands Mexico Factory


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Design, engineering and manufacturing service provider Parpro has completed expansion of its factory in Mexico, expecting business in the second half of the year to resume growth, according to company chairman and president Johnny Liao at an investor conference.

Parpro also has a factory in Taiwan and another two in the US. The two US factories accounted for 61% of 2018 consolidated revenues, the Taiwan one for 25%, and Mexico one for 14%. Parpro has added a SMT production line each at the Taiwan and Mexico plants.

Parpro produces devices/components used in aerospace, gaming, medical, industrial and networking equipment. As Parpro has passed US ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) certification, devices/components for use in defense-related products are expected to become a main source of business growth.

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