Saitama Murata Manufacturing Changes Company Name; Merges Vietnamese Subsidiaries


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Saitama Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd. a wholly-owned subsidiary of Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd. will be changing the company name of one of its Vietnamese manufacturing subsidiaries on February 17. In addition, from April 1, it will be merging its two Vietnamese manufacturing subsidiaries into a single company.

On February 17, the Vietnamese manufacturing subsidiary, Murata Manufacturing Vietnam Da Nang Co., Ltd. will change its name to Murata Manufacturing Vietnam CO., Ltd..

Then, on April 1, Murata Manufacturing Vietnam Ho Chi Minh Co., Ltd. will merge with Murata Manufacturing Vietnam CO., Ltd. which will be the surviving corporation.

Schedule of the name change and merger:

February 17: Murata Manufacturing Vietnam Da Nang Co., Ltd. will change its name to Murata Manufacturing Vietnam CO., Ltd.

April 1: Murata Manufacturing Vietnam Ho Chi Minh Co., Ltd. will merge with Murata Manufacturing Vietnam CO., Ltd.

The Saitama Murata Manufacturing Group manufactures high-quality and high-added-value coil products using a proprietary winding process. It joined the Murata Manufacturing Group in March 2014.

The merging of the manufacturing subsidiaries will improve the efficiency of Vietnamese operations and boost manufacturing capability, allowing for further growth in the coil industry.

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