Indium's Dr. Ron Lasky to Present During SMTA Webinar


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Indium Corporation expert Dr. Ron Lasky, senior technologist, will share his technical expertise on the basics of statistical process control during a multi-chapter webinar offered by the Surface Mount Technology Association (SMTA) at 3 p.m. New York time on Thursday, Sept. 15.

In Statistical Process Control 101, Dr. Lasky will cover statistical process control (SPC). SPC is an important tool in controlling SMT assembly processes, especially stencil printing. It will start with a discussion of the

6 Ms of variation and then delineate common cause and special cause variation. The difference between precision and accuracy will then be clarified. After discussing the precision tolerance ratio, the technique to perform a Gage R&R (Repeatability and Reproducibility) analysis will be presented. Process control charts and their development will be discussed including the Shewhart Rules. Lasky will plot and analyze several sets of SPC Xbar-R and C Chart data with commercial statistical software. The webinar will conclude with a discussion and application of the process capability indices Cp and Cpk.

Dr. Lasky is a senior technologist at Indium Corporation, as well as a professor of engineering and the director of the Lean Six Sigma program at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., U.S. He has more than 30 years of experience in electronics and optoelectronics packaging at IBM, Universal Instruments, and Cookson Electronics. Dr. Lasky has authored six books, and contributed to nine more, on science, electronics, and optoelectronics, and has authored numerous technical papers. Additionally, he has served as an adjunct professor at several colleges, teaching more than 20 different courses on topics ranging from electronics packaging, materials science, physics, mechanical engineering, and science and religion. Dr. Lasky holds numerous patent disclosures and is the developer of several SMT processing software products related to cost estimating, line balancing, and process optimization. He is the co-creator of Surface Mount Technology Association’s (SMTA) SMT Process Engineering Certification program and exams that set standards in the electronics assembly industry worldwide. Dr. Lasky was awarded the Surface Mount Technology Association’s (SMTA) Technical Distinction Award in 2021 for his “significant and continuing technical contributions to the SMTA.” He was also awarded SMTA’s prestigious Founder’s Award in 2003.


Download The Printed Circuit Assembler’s Guide to… Solder Defects by Christopher Nash and Dr. Ronald C. Lasky. You can also view other titles in our full I-007eBooks library. 

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